Enduring posts

Here are reminders of substantial posts I’ve added to this blog, which I don’t want to get buried in the archive. Usually (but not always) these are research-related, where possible including direct links to green open access versions of papers I have written or co-written and made freely available via Cardiff University’s open access repository.

Wicked problems

‘Wicked problems’ are particularly challenging for public services policymakers and for service developers. I’ve blogged about them a number of times, including in Some opening thoughts (1) and Some opening thoughts (2). Click the link to the paper below for the full text:

Hannigan B. and Coffey M. (2011) Where the wicked problems are: the case of mental health. Health Policy 101 (3) 220-227

Work and roles

In Sphygmomanometers, remedial gymnasts and mental health work I blogged about divisions of work. Follow this link for the full text paper:

Hannigan B. and Allen D. (2006) Complexity and change in the United Kingdom’s system of mental health care. Social Theory & Health 4 (3) 244-263

And, in this Giving a fig about roles post I blogged about a data-based article showing how community mental health workers’ roles are shaped by local organisational features. Here’s a link to a version of the paper:

Hannigan B. and Allen D. (2011) Giving a fig about roles: policy, context and work in community mental health care. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing 18 (1) 1-8

Mental health nurses in England and Wales can become approved mental health professionals (AMHPs), and Michael Coffey and I have written about what this means for nursing. I blogged about our paper in this Nursing and the approved mental health professional role post. Here’s a link to the full paper:

Coffey M. and Hannigan B. (2013) New roles for nurses as approved mental health professionals in England and Wales: A discussion paper. International Journal of Nursing Studies 50 (10) 1423-1430

In a post titled Learning from the study of trajectories I wrote about the value of following the journeys taken by service users as they move through parts of an interconnected system of health and social care. The blog is associated with a paper I wrote with Davina Allen, the full text of which can be found here:

Hannigan B. and Allen D. (2013) Complex caring trajectories in community mental health: contingencies, divisions of labor and care coordination. Community Mental Health Journal 49 (4) 380-388

In this Better late than never post I used the publication of the DSM5 as the starting point for a piece on contested knowledge, work and roles.

In a post titled Doing crisis work post I blogged about the roles of staff in crisis resolution and home treatment services, adding a link to this paper:

Hannigan B. (2014) ‘There’s a lot of tasks that can be done by any’: findings from an ethnographic study into work and organisation in UK community crisis resolution and home treatment services. Health: an Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine 18 (4) 406-421

Care planning and care coordination in mental health

I have had the opportunity to work on a number of large studies investigating care planning and care coordination in community and hospital mental health settings. Many of my posts have made reference to these, and searches for COCAPP and COCAPP-A will turn them up.

Published papers from these studies include the COCAPP protocol, which I wrote about here. Here’s a link to the paper:

Simpson A., Hannigan B., Coffey M., Jones A., Barlow S., Cohen R., Všetečková J., Faulkner A. and Haddad M. (2015) Study protocol: Cross-national comparative case study of recovery-focused mental health care planning and coordination (COCAPP) BMC Psychiatry 15 (145)

Here, too, is a link to our main findings paper:

Simpson A., Hannigan B., Coffey M., Barlow S., Cohen R., Jones A., Všetečková J., Faulkner A., Thornton A. and Cartwright M. (2016) Recovery-focused care planning and coordination in England and Wales: a cross-national mixed methods comparative case study. BMC Psychiatry 16 (147)

One of the most important sets of findings from COCAPP related to risk assessment and management. Here is a post I wrote to coincide with the publication of a paper in this area. The article itself can be downloaded here:

Coffey M., Cohen R., Faulkner A., Simpson A., Hannigan B. and Barlow S. (in press) Ordinary risks and accepted fictions: how contrasting and competing priorities work in risk assessment and mental health care planning. Health Expectations

And, for the complete COCAPP story, follow this link to a post written on the day our final report was published.

Critical junctures

In a number of posts, including this one, I have written about ‘critical junctures’. This idea arises from a paper written with Nicola Evans, the full text of which can be found here:

Hannigan B. and Evans N. (2013) Critical junctures in health and social care: service user experiences, work and system connections. Social Theory & Health 11 (4) 428-444

For interest, readers may also want to follow up this post I contributed to the LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog which says a little more about the origins of this ‘critical junctures’ paper.

Complex systems

Health and social care is full of interconnections, and a complex systems perspective offers a way of thinking about (and researching) what this means. I have written about this in a number of places, including in this Care work and health system complexity post. This makes reference to this paper:

Hannigan B. (2013) Connections and consequences in complex systems: insights from a case study of the emergence and local impact of crisis resolution and home treatment services. Social Science & Medicine 93 212-219

Risk in child and adolescent mental health services

The RiSC study was an evidence synthesis of risk, broadly conceived, in inpatient child and adolescent mental health services. In this post I included the plain English summary from our gold open access final report, which can be downloaded here:

Hannigan B., Edwards D., Evans N., Gillen E., Longo M., Pryjmachuk S. and Trainor G. (2015) An evidence synthesis of risk identification, assessment and management for young people using tier 4 inpatient child and adolescent mental health services. Health Services and Delivery Research 3 (22)

For a shorter read, try this paper:

Edwards D., Evans N., Gillen E., Longo M., Pryjmachuk S., Trainor G. and Hannigan B. (2015) What do we know about the risks for young people moving into, through and out of inpatient mental health care? Findings from an evidence synthesis. Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health 9 (55)

And if you’re really pushed for time, here’s the RiSC accessible summary.

Mental health needs and services in Palestine

Dr Mohammad Marie was a PhD student of mine, and investigated resilience in Palestinian community mental health nurses. With Mohammad and Aled Jones (my co-superviser) I’ve co-authored papers from this PhD, including one I blogged about here. Here’s the full text:

Marie M., Jones A. and Hannigan B. (2016) Mental health needs and services in the West Bank, Palestine. International Journal of Mental Health Systems 10 (23)

In a second published paper Mohammad, Aled and I reported on sources of resilience. Here’s a link to the post, and here’s the gold open access paper:

Marie M., Hannigan B. and Jones A. (in press) Resilience of nurses who work in community mental health workplaces in Palestine. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

Two further papers are these:

Marie M., Hannigan B. and Jones A. (in press) Challenges for community mental health nurses in Palestine. International Journal of Mental Health Systems

Marie M., Hannigan B. and Jones A. (in press) Social ecology of resilience and Sumud of Palestinians. Health: an Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine

Stress and mental health workers

In Stress and community mental health nurses I gave a brief introduction to a series of Cardiff-based studies focusing on stress in mental health workers and what to do about it.

Research ethics and governance

In this post I blogged about my experiences of seeking research ethics and governance approval. Follow this link for the full text paper:

Hannigan B. and Allen D. (2003) A tale of two studies: research governance issues arising from two ethnographic investigations into the organisation of health and social care. International Journal of Nursing Studies 40 (7) 685-695

Education for community mental health work

Prompted by discussions in the workplace I wrote this piece reflecting on my long involvement in the post-qualification education of community mental health practitioners. This references a series of research and discussion articles I had the chance to publish at the end of the 1990s and the start of the 2000s.

Mental health services at a time of austerity

In this post I added a link to a special, free-to-download, ‘impact of austerity’ edition of Mental Health Nursing journal, within which I contributed a paper on austerity, services, work and roles.

Writing a dissertation

This is one for students. I wrote this brief piece as an introduction to a paper giving an overview on the construction of undergraduate dissertations. The paper can be downloaded here:

Hannigan B. and Burnard P. (2001) Preparing and writing an undergraduate dissertation. Nurse Education in Practice 1 (4) 175-180

What I do at work: simply put

In this post I described what I do at work using only the commonest 1,000 words in the English language, in Up Goer Five style.

7 Responses to Enduring posts

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  6. Alexander Brian says:

    This blog site is awesome. A resource that will be first to be considered in the future. As a student nurse, being able to access a breath of experiences, educational perspectives and policy information is helpful.

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