Tag: Public Uni

Cardiff Public Uni

Last week on this site I wrote a brief piece trailing the seventh Cardiff Public Uni at Chapter. Here, now, is a summary of what happened extracted from the Cardiff Business School news archive:

Five academics presented their research in digestible bite-size chunks at the 7th Public Uni event held at Chapter Arts Centre, Thursday 15 October 2015.

The evening’s topics represented a diverse range of disciplines and themes, bringing together academics from the arts, humanities and sciences.

Dr Ben Hannigan, Reader in Mental Health Nursing at Cardiff University’s School of Healthcare Sciences, kicked off proceedings with a look at how the majority of formal mental health care, in the last century, was provided in hospitals but this changed with the emergence of community care. Dr Hannigan discussed how this came about and the people, policies and practices found within the system now.

Female menstruation remains a largely unspoken topic, simultaneously mundane and taboo. Dr Victoria Leonard, from the School of History, Archaeology and Religion at Cardiff University, explored how entrenched the silence is around monthly bleeding showing how it has been received and represented throughout history.

Dr Dan Read, from the Cardiff University’s School of Physics and Astronomy, highlighted how we have been aware of the existence of magnetic materials since the 4th century BC and asked what have they done for us? His talk illuminated the eventful and fascinating history of magnets.

Cardiff Business School’s Professor Peter Turnbull asked how safe is it to fly, given major cost cutting exercises, and looked at the growing concerns of European regulators that have yet to filter through to the travelling public.

The evening’s final speaker was Dr Emily Garside who explores how plays about AIDS often became first-line of response for activism, awareness raising and fundraising. She explored whether how we use theatre to talk about HIV/AIDS in the UK today.

Speaking about the event, moderator Dr Marco Hauptmeier from Cardiff Business School, said: “The Public Uni series continues to go from strength to strength, generating real buzz, enthusiasm and audience engagement.

“As researchers it is exciting to be able to breakdown your research for an audience, hear their response to it and consider their insights and perspectives. We look forward to continuing to develop the Public Uni series, providing an accessible platform for the diverse and important social, political and cultural research produced across Cardiff.”

The Public Uni series, organised by Dr Marco Hauptmeier from Cardiff Business School and Harriet Lloyd from the School of English, Communication & Philosophy, gives researchers the opportunity to present their ideas and findings to the public in short 10-minute segments. The informal setting and relaxed atmosphere helps to make the research more accessible to audiences outside of the academic arena. Each event highlights the breadth and depth of the exciting research undertaken at Cardiff University.

Follow on Facebook and Twitter to heart about forthcoming events in the Public Uni series or sign-up to the mailing list.

I can confirm that the evening was a thoroughly enlightening and enjoyable one. My thinking now is that the relationship between the ten minute Public Uni format and the standard lecture is comparable to the relationship between Twitter and the traditional academic essay. Succinct, direct, engaging.

Public Uni

After finishing work next Thursday (October 15th 2015) I’ll be heading off to Chapter to take part in the 7th Public Uni. At Public Uni, which is organised by Marco Hauptmeier in the Cardiff Business School, academics get a ten minute opportunity to present their research to an assembled audience. I gather there is some retiring to the bar at some point in the evening, which seems very sensible.

Here’s the flyer for next week’s event: and what an eclectic bunch us five speakers are! In my slot the aim is to compress a history of mental health care, and a summary of where we are now, into 600 seconds of talking. What fun! For a taster of what I’m planning to say, here’s my summary:

Changing landscapeUntil the middle of the last century most formal mental health care was provided in hospitals. This changed with the emergence of community care. Dr Ben Hannigan, Reader in Mental Health Nursing in the School of Healthcare Sciences, explains how this change came about and discusses the people, policies and practices found within the system now.