Building research capacity

Last night I enjoyed an evening event in Cardiff with other past, and present, members of the RCBC (Research Capacity Building Collaboration) Wales Community of Scholars. This is a collaborative venture supported by higher education institutions, with funds now coming from NISCHR. Since coming into being in 2006 the RCBC programme has sought to develop research capacity across nursing, midwifery and the allied health professions. I’ve written about the scheme on this blog before (see here and here), and am personally grateful for the support I received as an RCBC Post-Doctoral Fellow which enabled me to complete my study into the work and system impact of crisis resolution and home treatment teams. For more on what I found in that project, check out these green open access articles saved in Cardiff University’s ORCA repository:

Hannigan B. and Coffey M. (2011) Where the wicked problems are: the case of mental health. Health Policy 101 (3) 220-227

Hannigan B. (2014) ‘There’s a lot of tasks that can be done by any’: findings from an ethnographic study into work and organisation in UK community crisis resolution and home treatment services. Health: an Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine 18 (4) 406-421

Hannigan B. and Evans N. (2013) Critical junctures in health and social care: service user experiences, work and system connections. Social Theory & Health 11 (4) 428-444

Hannigan B. (2013) Connections and consequences in complex systems: insights from a case study of the emergence and local impact of crisis resolution and home treatment services. Social Science & Medicine 93 212-219

Last night began with a talk from Tina Donnelly, Director of RCN Wales and Commanding Officer of the 203 Welsh Field Hospital. In introducing Tina, RCBC Grant Holder Professor Donna Mead (from the University of South Wales) shared the news that the RCBC scheme has received confirmation from NISCHR of continued funding. That’s good, and means we can look forward to more doctoral (and hopefully, post-doctoral) opportunities in the coming months and years.

 

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